Watch out for thin ice

Towards the left a couple stand alone on a wooden walkway that stretches into the distance, looking out to the right over the untouched, snowy expanse of Kaivopuisto park. It is a clear and sunny day with a pastel blue sky.
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Although the magnificent winter weather tempts you to enjoy the nature, walking on ice is not always safe. Here are a few safety things you should keep in mind.

Ice conditions vary depending on the temperature and the location. The best ice conditions are usually in February, but that doesn’t mean it’s always safe to walk on the ice in February. Ice conditions deteriorate rapidly in March.

Always check the local ice conditions in advance – the easiest way is to ask locals who are walking in the area. The Finnish Meteorological Institute also posts information about ice conditions on their website and on BALFI service.

You can never be a hundred percent certain that the ice will carry you, so if you plan to trek across natural ice, pack a set of ice claws with you just in case. You should also familiarise yourself with how to use them in advance.

Never go out onto the ice alone, but keep a safe distance between yourself and the person in front of you in case either one of you goes through the ice.

Never walk too close to openings in the ice or under bridges, through narrow straits or where there are fast-flowing streams or currents.

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Although the magnificent winter weather tempts you to enjoy the nature, walking on ice is not always safe. Here are a few safety things you should keep in mind.